Infinity Music Hall & Bistro
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Josh Ritter with John Fullbright

Infinity Norfolk


Fri, June 20, 2014
Norfolk, CT
Show at 8 PM

Ticket INFO

Price: $30 - $45

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Americana / Pop
Josh Ritter with John Fullbright

Josh Ritter


Artist Bio

Tagged as one of the "100 Greatest Living Songwriters" by Paste Magazine, Josh Ritter is certainly that. Sold out tours, amazing reviews, stellar records and multiple radio hits have become the norm for this truly talented artist and captivating performer.

The Beast In Its Tracks, the new album from renowned singer-songwriter Josh Ritter, will be released March 5 on Pytheas Recordings. Of the record, Ritter says, “In the year after my marriage ended, I realized that I had more new songs than I’d ever had at one time. Far from the grand, sweeping feel of the songs on So Runs the World Away, these new songs felt like rocks in the shoe, hard little nuggets of whatever they were, be it spite, remorse, or happiness.”

Ritter & The Royal City Band will celebrate the release of The Beast In Its Tracks with a North American tour. All concert tickets are bundled with a unique musical package including a redemption code to download The Beast In Its Tracks upon release date. Ticket purchasers will also receive an immediate download of the album’s first single, “Joy To You Baby.” The Beast In Its Tracks will also be available in a deluxe edition vinyl package and CD format.

This is the sixth full-length recording from Ritter, who has been widely heralded by critics and fans alike. As a special preview, a trailer of the album can be viewed here. Additionally, the record can be pre-ordered at and iTunes and the first single, “Joy To You Baby,” is now available to be purchased as a limited edition hand-numbered 7” single and digital download.

Recorded during 2011-2012 at the Great North Sound Society in Parsonsfield, Maine, The Beast In Its Tracks continues Ritter’s longtime collaboration with producer and keyboard player Sam Kassirer. As Josh describes, “I hadn’t composed this stuff, I’d scrawled it down, just trying to keep ahead of the heartbreak. They needed to be recorded like that. We needed to work fast, make decisions quickly, keep the songs as spare as they could be kept, and above all never allow ourselves to blunt the sharp edges. Some of the songs were mean or evil. So be it.”

The new album follows Ritter’s 2010 release, So Runs The World Away, of which Bob Boilen from NPR Music declared, “I’ve come to expect good records from him...but this one took my breath away,” while the Boston Globe praised, “quite sensational…marks the finest music he has made.”

In 2011, Ritter made is debut as a published author with his New York Times Best-selling novel, Bright’s Passage (Dial Press/Random House). Of the work, Stephen King writes in The New York Times Book Review, “Shines with a compressed lyricism that recalls Ray Bradbury in his prime...This is the work of a gifted novelist.”

Similar Artists:

Joe Pug, Joe Purdy, Justin Townes Earle, Langhorne Slim, Dawes

John Fullbright

Connect with this artist:

"What's so bad about happy?" John Fullbright sings on the opening track of his new album, 'Songs.' It's a play on the writer's curse, the notion that new material can only come through heartbreak or depression, that great art is only born from suffering. 

That plainspoken approach is part of what's fueled the young Oklahoman's remarkable rise. It was just two years ago that Fullbright released his debut studio album, 'From The Ground Up,' to a swarm of critical acclaim. The LA Times called the record "preternaturally self-assured," while NPR hailed him as one of the 10 Artists You Should Have Known in 2012, saying "it's not every day a new artist…earns comparisons to great songwriters like Townes Van Zandt and Randy Newman, but Fullbright's music makes sense in such lofty company." The Wall Street Journal crowned him as giving one of the year's 10 best live performances, and the album also earned him the ASCAP Foundation's Harold Adamson Lyric Award. If there was any doubt that his debut announced the arrival of a songwriting force to be reckoned with, it was put to rest when 'From The Ground Up' was nominated for Best Americana Album at the GRAMMY Awards, which placed Fullbright alongside icons like Bonnie Raitt, Emmylou Harris, Levon Helm, and Lucinda Williams. 

"I never came into this with a whole lot of expectations," says Fullbright. "I just wanted to write really good songs, and with that outlook, everything else is a perk. The fact that we went to LA and played "Gawd Above" in front of a star-studded audience [at the GRAMMY pre-tel concert], never in my life would I have imagined that." 

But for Fullbright, it hasn't been all the acclaim that means the most to him, but rather his entrance into a community of songwriters whose work he admires. 

But just as important to Fullbright as writing is careful editing. "I can write a first verse and a chorus fairly easily, and it's important just to document it at the time and come back to it later," he explains. "That's the labor, when you really get your tools out and figure out how to craft something that's worthwhile."

Fullbright inhabits his songs' narrators completely, his old-soul voice fleshing out complex characters and subtle narratives with a gifted sense of understatement.

The songs also reflect how drastically Fullbright's life has changed since the release of 'From The Ground Up,' which launched him into a rigorous schedule of international touring. "Going Home" finds him appreciating the simple pleasure of heading back to Oklahoma, which he likens to The Odyssey. "When you're gone for so long, once you know you're headed in the right direction to your own bed and your own home, that's one of the greatest feelings you can have," he says. "I Didn't Know" is a song he premiered live at concert hosted by Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell, a story he tells still somewhat incredulously, while "When You're Here" is a somber piano love song, and "The One That Lives Too Far" is a raw account of the strain that distance can put on a romantic relationship.

To be sure, 'Songs' has its moments of darkness, tracks born from pain and heartbreak, but for a craftsman like Fullbright, there are few greater joys than carving emotion into music, taking a stab at that lofty goal of immortality through song. It makes him—and his fans—happy, and there's nothing bad about that. 


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